Lachenal Edeophone

Lachenal Edeophone

My primary instrument is a Lachenal Edeophone with raised metal ends. It was made in London in about 1920 and it was the top-of-the-range instrument produced by Lachenal & Co. Whereas most concertinas have 48 buttons and a 3.5 octave range, this particular instrument has 64 buttons and 4.5 octaves. This means that it is an extended treble but with the extension being with higher notes, rather than the more useful lower range. However, if the extra 16 buttons had been in the baritone range it would have meant a very much larger and heavier instrument, which I could not so easily be used to play while standing. Having said that, it has a beautiful sweet tone and, when playing with a group of instruments, it can be heard because of its clear sound, almost like a whistle being heard above much more powerful instruments. And its clear tone is also evident when it is played quietly, a mark of a quality instrument. As you can gather, I love my Edeophone!

 
Wheatstone Bariton

Wheatstone Bariton

Unlike my Edeophone, my Wheatstone Baritone has a very soft tone. It has wooden ends and it was made in about 1903. Quite simply, in range it is a whole octave below that of my Edeophone. Hence, it is not well suited to play for morris dancing or in music sessions. When its very distinctive tone comes into its own is when I use it to accompany myself singing. When I have used it to play chords, I have been told that its deep gentle tone sounds rather like a harmonium.